Equine Studies

The general Equine Studies major allows flexibility for students wishing to explore different areas of equine study. Together with your advisor, you will choose electives that emphasize areas of special interest and address specific career goals. Students who are undecided as to their future role in the equine industry will be able to explore various options through courses in equine science, training, riding instruction, stable management and business. The flexibility afforded by the general Equine Studies curriculum is also best suited for those wishing to pursue a second major or minor.

Equine Studies Major (46 credit hours)

Saint Mary of-the-Woods College requires a total of 125 credit hours for completion of a Bachelor's degree, including fulfillment of all general studies requirements.

Equine Studies Major - Required Equine Courses

Complete the following courses.

This course is required of all equine studies majors, minors, and equestrian team members, and is offered each semester in concentrated form. It serves as an introduction to the rules, regulations and procedures of the Equine Center, with special attention to safety, proper techniques, and personal performance of each student. It will also aid in the placement of students at proper riding levels.

Comprised of eight one-credit courses, this series stresses the practical, applied aspects of stable management. Included are horse care and handling, management and upkeep of facilities, equipment operation and maintenance, personnel issues, public relations, and record keeping. Students will work closely with instructors to learn and practice skills necessary to effectively maintain and manage an equine facility. Each student will be responsible for the care of a horse throughout their stable management experience. Proficiency test will be given each semester.

Stresses behavior modification and safe handling techniques. Emphasis is on understanding normal equine behaviors as they relate to training and management.

Provides an overview of the anatomy, normal function and pathology of the body systems of the horse, excepting the skeletomuscular system. Prevention and management of common disorders is stressed.

Physiology of digestion, principles of nutrition and feeding, nutrient requirements and deficiencies, and parasitological are covered. Practical considerations for effective nutritional management, including ration formulation, are emphasized. Anatomy, normal function, and disorders of the digestive system are included.

Comprised of eight one-credit courses, this series stresses the practical, applied aspects of stable management. Included are horse care and handling, management and upkeep of facilities, equipment operation and maintenance, personnel issues, public relations, and record keeping. Students will work closely with instructors to learn and practice skills necessary to effectively maintain and manage an equine facility. Each student will be responsible for the care of a horse throughout their stable management experience. Proficiency test will be given each semester.

Comprised of eight one-credit courses, this series stresses the practical, applied aspects of stable management. Included are horse care and handling, management and upkeep of facilities, equipment operation and maintenance, personnel issues, public relations, and record keeping. Students will work closely with instructors to learn and practice skills necessary to effectively maintain and manage an equine facility. Each student will be responsible for the care of a horse throughout their stable management experience. Proficiency test will be given each semester.

Course covers the anatomy, normal function and pathology of the skeleto-muscular system. Emphasis is placed on prevention, diagnosis and management of common lameness.

Comprised of eight one-credit courses, this series stresses the practical, applied aspects of stable management. Included are horse care and handling, management and upkeep of facilities, equipment operation and maintenance, personnel issues, public relations, and record keeping. Students will work closely with instructors to learn and practice skills necessary to effectively maintain and manage an equine facility. Each student will be responsible for the care of a horse throughout their stable management experience. Proficiency test will be given each semester.

Important considerations of running an equine-related business, such as insurance, personnel issues, budgeting, liability, taxes, capital, credit, business planning, record-keeping, marketing and public relations are emphasized. Proper design, planning and construction of equine facilities is also covered.

Equine Studies Major - Electives

Choose 17 credit hours of equine studies electives. Consult with your academic advisor for assistance. All equine courses are listed in the college catalog.

Equine Studies Major - Required Courses

Choose between BU241 or BU251.
BI101 (Biology: Unity and Diversity) is a required course but counts towards general study requirements.

A study of the normal integrated functioning of the human organism in the context of principles and concepts relating the human organism to its environment. The major unifying concept of biology – evolution – is used as a framework for this study. Emphasis is placed on the scientific method and other problem-solving techniques. Fulfills general studies requirement. Course fee applies. Prerequisite: Score of 38 or better on mathematics placement exam or completion of MA 101.

Emphasizes management functions and management systems. Enhances understanding of the managerial role and its influence on organizational performance. Facilitates understanding of managerial activities involving human, technical and conceptual skills within behavioral, classical and management science approaches.

Surveys the process of product design, packaging, pricing, advertising, distribution and sales of goods and services. Emphasizes not only management decisions made in each of these processes, but also usable management tools. Emphasis is also placed on the marketing concept of discovering and fulfilling human needs.

Equine Studies Minor (20 credit hours)

Equine Studies Minor - Required Courses

Complete the following courses in addition to 6 credit hours of equine electives.

This course is required of all equine studies majors, minors, and equestrian team members, and is offered each semester in concentrated form. It serves as an introduction to the rules, regulations and procedures of the Equine Center, with special attention to safety, proper techniques, and personal performance of each student. It will also aid in the placement of students at proper riding levels.

Comprised of eight one-credit courses, this series stresses the practical, applied aspects of stable management. Included are horse care and handling, management and upkeep of facilities, equipment operation and maintenance, personnel issues, public relations, and record keeping. Students will work closely with instructors to learn and practice skills necessary to effectively maintain and manage an equine facility. Each student will be responsible for the care of a horse throughout their stable management experience. Proficiency test will be given each semester.

Stresses behavior modification and safe handling techniques. Emphasis is on understanding normal equine behaviors as they relate to training and management.

Provides an overview of the anatomy, normal function and pathology of the body systems of the horse, excepting the skeletomuscular system. Prevention and management of common disorders is stressed.

Physiology of digestion, principles of nutrition and feeding, nutrient requirements and deficiencies, and parasitological are covered. Practical considerations for effective nutritional management, including ration formulation, are emphasized. Anatomy, normal function, and disorders of the digestive system are included.

Important considerations of running an equine-related business, such as insurance, personnel issues, budgeting, liability, taxes, capital, credit, business planning, record-keeping, marketing and public relations are emphasized. Proper design, planning and construction of equine facilities is also covered.

Equine Studies Associate Degree (32 credit hours)

Equine Studies Associate Degree - Required Equine Courses

Complete the following courses.

This course is required of all equine studies majors, minors, and equestrian team members, and is offered each semester in concentrated form. It serves as an introduction to the rules, regulations and procedures of the Equine Center, with special attention to safety, proper techniques, and personal performance of each student. It will also aid in the placement of students at proper riding levels.

Comprised of eight one-credit courses, this series stresses the practical, applied aspects of stable management. Included are horse care and handling, management and upkeep of facilities, equipment operation and maintenance, personnel issues, public relations, and record keeping. Students will work closely with instructors to learn and practice skills necessary to effectively maintain and manage an equine facility. Each student will be responsible for the care of a horse throughout their stable management experience. Proficiency test will be given each semester.

Stresses behavior modification and safe handling techniques. Emphasis is on understanding normal equine behaviors as they relate to training and management.

Provides an overview of the anatomy, normal function and pathology of the body systems of the horse, excepting the skeletomuscular system. Prevention and management of common disorders is stressed.

Physiology of digestion, principles of nutrition and feeding, nutrient requirements and deficiencies, and parasitological are covered. Practical considerations for effective nutritional management, including ration formulation, are emphasized. Anatomy, normal function, and disorders of the digestive system are included.

Comprised of eight one-credit courses, this series stresses the practical, applied aspects of stable management. Included are horse care and handling, management and upkeep of facilities, equipment operation and maintenance, personnel issues, public relations, and record keeping. Students will work closely with instructors to learn and practice skills necessary to effectively maintain and manage an equine facility. Each student will be responsible for the care of a horse throughout their stable management experience. Proficiency test will be given each semester.

Important considerations of running an equine-related business, such as insurance, personnel issues, budgeting, liability, taxes, capital, credit, business planning, record-keeping, marketing and public relations are emphasized. Proper design, planning and construction of equine facilities is also covered.

Equine Studies Associate Degree - Electives

Choose 13 credit hours of equine studies electives. Consult with your academic advisor for assistance. All equine courses are listed in the college catalog.

Equine Studies Associate Degree - Required Courses

Choose between BU241 or BU251.
BI101 (Biology: Unity and Diversity) is a required course but counts towards general study requirements.

A study of the normal integrated functioning of the human organism in the context of principles and concepts relating the human organism to its environment. The major unifying concept of biology – evolution – is used as a framework for this study. Emphasis is placed on the scientific method and other problem-solving techniques. Fulfills general studies requirement. Course fee applies. Prerequisite: Score of 38 or better on mathematics placement exam or completion of MA 101.

Emphasizes management functions and management systems. Enhances understanding of the managerial role and its influence on organizational performance. Facilitates understanding of managerial activities involving human, technical and conceptual skills within behavioral, classical and management science approaches.

Surveys the process of product design, packaging, pricing, advertising, distribution and sales of goods and services. Emphasizes not only management decisions made in each of these processes, but also usable management tools. Emphasis is also placed on the marketing concept of discovering and fulfilling human needs.

Information about Course Requirements
For the most current course requirements please review the latest undergraduate college catalog.  Always consult your academic advisor when registering for courses or when you have questions about course requirements.