Equine Training and Instruction

The Equine Training and Instruction major is designed for students wishing to become an equine trainer or instructor. The program prepares the student to teach equitation and/or develop a personal training philosophy that can be applied after graduation in a variety of equine jobs. Throughout your course work you will be exposed to many different concepts and approaches to training and instructing. Students may acquire experience in schooling problem horses, handling and starting young horses, and working in a specific discipline such as dressage, jumping, western riding/reining, or timed event. The curriculum may be tailored to emphasize horse training, or instructing, or a combination of both. An emphasis in therapeutic riding may also be added.

Equine Training and Instruction Course Requirements 
(46 credit hours)

Equine Training and Instruction - Required Equine Courses

43 credit hours required. Complete all courses listed plus an additional 2 hours of equine electives and 8 hours of equine riding courses.

This course is required of all equine studies majors, minors, and equestrian team members, and is offered each semester in concentrated form. It serves as an introduction to the rules, regulations and procedures of the Equine Center, with special attention to safety, proper techniques, and personal performance of each student. It will also aid in the placement of students at proper riding levels.

Comprised of eight one-credit courses, this series stresses the practical, applied aspects of stable management. Included are horse care and handling, management and upkeep of facilities, equipment operation and maintenance, personnel issues, public relations, and record keeping. Students will work closely with instructors to learn and practice skills necessary to effectively maintain and manage an equine facility. Each student will be responsible for the care of a horse throughout their stable management experience. Proficiency test will be given each semester.

Stresses behavior modification and safe handling techniques. Emphasis is on understanding normal equine behaviors as they relate to training and management.

Provides an overview of the anatomy, normal function and pathology of the body systems of the horse, excepting the skeletomuscular system. Prevention and management of common disorders is stressed.

Physiology of digestion, principles of nutrition and feeding, nutrient requirements and deficiencies, and parasitological are covered. Practical considerations for effective nutritional management, including ration formulation, are emphasized. Anatomy, normal function, and disorders of the digestive system are included.

Comprised of eight one-credit courses, this series stresses the practical, applied aspects of stable management. Included are horse care and handling, management and upkeep of facilities, equipment operation and maintenance, personnel issues, public relations, and record keeping. Students will work closely with instructors to learn and practice skills necessary to effectively maintain and manage an equine facility. Each student will be responsible for the care of a horse throughout their stable management experience. Proficiency test will be given each semester.

The basic concepts of training the young or older horse will be explored, with emphasis on the horse‘s psychological makeup and how it influences his capacity to learn. Ground training and current training techniques will be introduced relative to understanding of how these skills influence horse behavior.

Students will examine the theories behind various riding techniques, and the ways in which they promote body awareness and control in the rider. Application of this knowledge will allow the student to improve overall performance of the horse especially with respect to balance, carriage, and communication.

This course is designed to give students experience in evaluating horses and riders, developing a program to produce optimum results. Emphasis will be placed on understanding the mechanics of the horse and its functions, as well as defining and understanding correct position of the rider. Students will study effective methods of teaching, including ways of dealing with riders who vary in ability, age, and level of confidence.

Course covers the principles and techniques of preparing a horse for sale, grooming for competition and proper selection, care and use of equipment.

Comprised of eight one-credit courses, this series stresses the practical, applied aspects of stable management. Included are horse care and handling, management and upkeep of facilities, equipment operation and maintenance, personnel issues, public relations, and record keeping. Students will work closely with instructors to learn and practice skills necessary to effectively maintain and manage an equine facility. Each student will be responsible for the care of a horse throughout their stable management experience. Proficiency test will be given each semester.

Course covers the anatomy, normal function and pathology of the skeleto-muscular system. Emphasis is placed on prevention, diagnosis and management of common lameness.

Concepts such as bending and improving the horse‘s balance will be emphasized. Students will become acquainted with rhythm, suppleness and impulsion. Upon completion, the student should be able to maintain a consistent frame.

Comprised of eight one-credit courses, this series stresses the practical, applied aspects of stable management. Included are horse care and handling, management and upkeep of facilities, equipment operation and maintenance, personnel issues, public relations, and record keeping. Students will work closely with instructors to learn and practice skills necessary to effectively maintain and manage an equine facility. Each student will be responsible for the care of a horse throughout their stable management experience. Proficiency test will be given each semester.

Important considerations of running an equine-related business, such as insurance, personnel issues, budgeting, liability, taxes, capital, credit, business planning, record-keeping, marketing and public relations are emphasized. Proper design, planning and construction of equine facilities is also covered.

Equine Training and Instruction - Other Required Courses

Choose between BU241 OR BU251.
BI101 (Biology) is a general studies course and counts towards general studies course requirements.

A study of the normal integrated functioning of the human organism in the context of principles and concepts relating the human organism to its environment. The major unifying concept of biology – evolution – is used as a framework for this study. Emphasis is placed on the scientific method and other problem-solving techniques. Fulfills general studies requirement. Course fee applies. Prerequisite: Score of 38 or better on mathematics placement exam or completion of MA 101.

Emphasizes management functions and management systems. Enhances understanding of the managerial role and its influence on organizational performance. Facilitates understanding of managerial activities involving human, technical and conceptual skills within behavioral, classical and management science approaches.

Surveys the process of product design, packaging, pricing, advertising, distribution and sales of goods and services. Emphasizes not only management decisions made in each of these processes, but also usable management tools. Emphasis is also placed on the marketing concept of discovering and fulfilling human needs.

Information about Course Requirements
For the most current course requirements please review the latest undergraduate college catalog.  Always consult your academic advisor when registering for courses or when you have questions about course requirements.