Traditional Bachelor of Science in Nursing

Begin your journey toward a bachelor’s degree in nursing at Saint Mary-of-the-Woods College. Rooted in the strong foundation of liberal arts, science and Catholic education, SMWC gives you the knowledge, skills and training you need not only to be successful on the licensure exam but also to aspire higher in your nursing career. Pursue your dream and achieve a Bachelor of Science in Nursing from The Woods.

  • Expert faculty with decades of nursing experience
  • Small classes and clinical courses with eight students or less
  • No wait list at this time
  • Curriculum and program outcomes designed by experts in the field with terminal degrees

At SMWC, you will benefit from a variety of simulated and real-world educational experiences. The nursing skills lab and modern chemistry labs provide students with state-of-the-art equipment and a simulated hospital learning environment. As a member of the Rural Health Innovative Collaborative (RHIC), SMWC also has access to an off-campus simulation center featuring sophisticated computer-driven high-fidelity mannequins that bridge the gap between theoretical learning and clinical practice. Additionally, The Woods has partnered with local healthcare organizations to provide students with real-world application and clinical experiences.

Program Learning Outcomes 

Rooted in the strong foundation of liberal arts, science, and Catholic education, graduates of the Bachelor of Science in nursing are expected to demonstrate the following outcomes:

  1. Utilize effective communication and collaboration skills through oral, written, and technology media with patients, nursing colleagues, and interprofessional team members.
  2. Promote holistic health, including spiritual well-being, through the support of wellness and health related activities for self and patients.
  3. Guard patient safety through critical thinking, information technology, data analysis, and risk management strategies.
  4. Provide effective, culturally sensitive and compassionate nursing care through the use of the nursing process that is supported by current, evidence-based research as indicated by educational preparation and scope of practice.
  5. Demonstrate effective leadership and management abilities through the competent coordination of patient care across the health care continuum.
  6. Advocate for social justice through the promotion of access, resources, quality health care, and prudent health policies.
  7. Exhibit professionalism through upholding the values, ethics, and standards of nursing.

All students are required to meet admission standards and take required courses.

Year 1 Courses

Includes the structure and functions of the integumentary, skeletal, muscular and nervous systems to human bodies as well as a general introduction to this area. Course fee.

Includes the structure and function of the endocrine, cardiovascular, lymphatic, digestive, respiratory, urinary, and reproductive systems as well as growth, development and genetics. Course Fee. Prerequisite: BI 231

This course presents an overview of microbiology, including fundamental structures of microorganisms, their metabolism, classification and interaction with other living things, and the laboratory techniques for their study. Introduces industrial and clinical applications of microbiology and clinically related areas of bacterial, viral, fungal, and parasitic involvement. Enrollment is restricted to students associated with the nursing program. Course fee. Prerequisites: BI 141 and BI 142.

Introductory chemistry lecture and laboratory course that covers the important aspects of general, organic, and biological chemistry (GOB) with applications to the field of nursing. Course Fee. Prerequisites: MA 101

Provides students with a theoretical foundation and application practice in a variety of communication contexts. Students examine the principles of effective communications and behaviors in intrapersonal, interpersonal, mass, and public communication. class activities and oral assignments engage students in the practical application of these principles. Fulfills general studies requirement. Campus only.

Offers students strategies for critical reading and writing, guided practice through the steps of the writing process, and instruction in library and on-line research. Emphasis on effective academic writing and the scholarly use of sources in documented research papers. Fulfills general studies requirement.

Elect to take FR111, SP111, or WC150 to fulfill the Woods Core Foreign Language requirements. For course descriptions see the Woods Core List.

Introduction to mathematical reasoning, algebraic concepts, and concepts from probability and statistics for students going into MA 253. Intended for students who do not place directly into MA 253 or who do not feel adequately prepared to go into MA 253. Topics include statements, truth tables, arguments, Euler diagrams, variables, exponents and order of operations, operations with integers, linear equations in one variable, ratios, proportions and percents, graphs, functions, types, organization and presentation of data, measures of central tendency, probability and counting rules. Fall and Spring, every year.

An overview of contemporary psychology introducing students to: human development, cognition and language, learning, memory, sensation, perception, motivation, emotion, biological basis of behavior, social psychology, personality, psychopathology and psychotherapy. The focus of the course is on both the scientific method of acquiring psychological data, as well as the theories which interpret that data and help guide further research in the field. For majors and non-majors, this course also serves as the prerequisite for most psychology classes. Fulfills general studies requirement.

WC 100 uses the concept of utopias, and how they have influenced societies, education and the world, to introduce students to the concept of the SMWC community and its particular values and ideas. Includes emphases on critical thinking and writing, as well as information literacy. Serves as a foundation to help students identify their individual goals and values.

Year 2 Courses

Explores the ethical issues related to biology and the practice of medicine.

Survey of major events and developments of twentieth-century history, worldwide. Topics will include the two World Wars; the Holocaust; independence movements in Europe‘s colonies; revolutions; communism, fascism, socialism, laissez-faire capitalism, economic globalization; women‘s liberation; cultural trends including cultural diversity; and the role of technology in shaping today‘s world.

Organization of data; binomial, normal and t distributions; estimation; hypothesis testing; correlation and regression; chi-square; analysis of variance; application to business decisions and experiments in natural and social sciences. Use of appropriate computer software. Fulfills general studies requirement. Prerequisite: MA112 or placement.

Examines the role of the professional nurse, including the history of nursing, nursing ethics, professional communication, career opportunities, use of information technology, and the application of evidence-based practice. Prerequisites: Admission to the nursing major.

Skills are developed relate to obtaining health histories, observation, occultation, and palpation of clients through the life span. Emphasis is placed on health teaching, the head-to-toe assessment, and selected body system assessments. Basic laboratory diagnostic values and normal growth and development are introduced. Thirty (30) didactic course hours, and forty-five (45) practice hours. Co-requisite: NU 210.

Through the framework of the nursing process, nursing skills are developed to provide client care. Adaptive care is provided for culturally sensitive issues, age variation, and gender concerns. Forty-five (45) didactic course hours and ninety (90) practice hours. Prerequisites: NU 210, and 211.

Focuses on the therapeutic action of medications and medication administration. Interactions with other medication, diet, and alternative therapy are examined related to client safety. Forty-five (45) didactic course hours and forty-five (45) practice hours. Prerequisites: NU 210, and 211.

Examines the philosophical roots of ideas and beliefs both of the western and non-western world by clarifying, questioning, and evaluating the most basic assumptions about life and meaning. Challenges students to think intentionally, seriously, rigorously, and thoroughly. Fulfills general studies requirement.

TH 200 is a study of religion and spirituality and their relationship to social justice, women’s issues and environmental sustainability. The course introduces students to the nature of religion and spirituality and examines how they can generate and support a vision of life focused on service and a commitment to social justice. The vision and ministries of the Sisters of Providence will be taken as examples and illustrations of a service-oriented lifestyle that is grounded in spirituality and religion.

Year 3 Courses

Introduces to the creative and critical processes in literature. Using examples of poetry, fiction, and drama this course emphasizes methods of writing and reading critically about literature. Fulfills Woods Core requirement.

Focuses on theory, application of the nursing process, and skill development for care of adults and older adults who experience acute and chronic medical conditions as well as traumatic injuries. Health promotion and evidence-based nursing care are provided in various health care settings and the community. Forty-five (45) didactic course hours and ninety (90) practice hours. Prerequisites: NU 220, and 222.

Continuation of Adult Nursing I, with a focus on adults and older adults with acute and chronic medical conditions as well as traumatic injuries. Health promotion and evidence-based nursing care is provided in various health care settings and the community. Forty-five (45) didactic course hours and ninety (90) practice hours. Prerequisites: NU 310.

Focuses on theory, application of the nursing process, and skill development for care of children, adolescents, adults, and older adults with psychiatric needs. Health promotion and evidence-based nursing care are provided in various health care settings and the community. Forty-five (45) didactic course hours and forty-five (45) practice hours. Prerequisites: NU 220.

Focuses on theory, application of the nursing process, and skill development for the care of women, families during pregnancy, birthing process, and infants. Health promotion and evidence-based nursing care are provided in various health care settings and the community. Forty-five (45) didactic course hours and forty-five (45) practice hours. Prerequisites: NU 220, and 222.

Focuses of the theory, application of the nursing process, and skill development for the care of children and adolescents with acute, chronic, and traumatic injuries. Health promotion and evidence-based nursing care are provided in various health care settings and the community. Forty-five (45) didactic course hours and forty-five (45) practice hours. Prerequisites: NU 220, and 222.

Emphasis is placed on developing an understanding of nursing theory, the logical process of research, on the scientific rigor necessary for carrying out studies of nursing interest, and on critically reading and using nursing research in nursing practice. Prerequisites: NU 220, and 222, or NU 305.

Studies human physical, cognitive, personality, emotional, social and moral development and change from conception to death. Prerequisite: PS111.

Provides an overview of crisis theory and interventions for working with clients in crisis. Crisis and conflict management theories, strategies and skills will be examined and applied to a variety of situations including those involving suicide, physical and sexual assault, natural and manmade disasters, grief or traumatic loss and violence in the workplace, the home, or the school.

Year 4 Courses

Elect to take AD200 or MU200 to fulfill the Woods Core Art requirements. For course descriptions see the Woods Core List.

Continuation of Adult Nursing II, with a focus on nursing care of adults and older adults who are in need of high acuity complex nursing care. Forty-five (45) didactic course hours and ninety (90) practice hours. Prerequisites: NU 320.

Focuses on leadership and management theories with the application to nursing practice. Emphasis is placed on the importance of effectively coordination of client care across various delivery systems. Prerequisites: NU 320, 340, and 342, or NU 305.

Explores public health nursing using health promotion, risk reduction, and disease management and control strategies with vulnerable clients, families, and populations. Community assessment, epidemiologic, environmental, change, political action, and case-management frameworks are used to guide evidence-based nursing care in community settings. Forty-five (45) didactic course hours and ninety (90) practice hours. Prerequisites: NU 320, 340, and 342, or NU 305.

Applies the role of the professional nurse, prepares the student for career advancement, and explores of current and future trends in nursing and health care. Forty-five (45) didactic course hours and ninety (90) practice hours. Prerequisites: NU 430, and 485, or NU 305.

Review of the theory and practice of nursing care for success on the licensure examination. Medications, therapeutic diets, diagnostic tests, and nursing procedures are reviewed through presentations and practice questions. Prerequisites NU 430, 455, and 485.

Elect to take WC401, WC402, or WC403 to fulfill the Woods Core Capstone requirements. For course descriptions see the Woods Core List.

  • Graduated from a state approved high school or its equivalent, such as a general equivalency degree (GED).
  • Successfully completed the pre-nursing core course work with a grade of “C” or better and can only be repeated once for grade improvement, including:
    • BI 231 Anatomy and Physiology I
    • BI 232 Anatomy and Physiology II
  • All attempted cognate courses must be completed with a "C" or better and can only be repeated once for grade improvement, these include:
    • PS 111 Psychology
    • CO 111 Intro to Communication
    • CH 121 General Organic Chemistry
    • MA 105 Finite Math
    • BI 252 Intro to Micro
    • MA 253 Statistics
    • BI 251 Bioethics
    • PS 260 Development Psychology
    • PS 486 Crisis Intervention
  • If a student does not earn a C during the second attempt for prerequisite, cognate, or nursing courses, they are dismissed from the program. Failed nursing courses at other institutions count as a failed course for this program as well.
  • The Nursing Admission Committee review all previously earned college credit, and students must have earned an overall 2.5 GPA.
  • Scored a 63% on the Assessment Technology Inc. entrance examination identified as the Test of Essential Academic Skills (TEAS) within the current academic year
    • Regardless of the location of the testing site, a student may only attempt this exam twice per admission cycle. If students attempt this exam more than twice, regardless of the location, the Department of Nursing will only look at the first two scores.
  • Current criminal background check within the two years of admission
  • Negative Drug Screen within the last 30 days of application
  • If a student is denied admission to the program they must wait a full year to reapply the following fall. If the student is denied for two consecutive years in a row, the student is not eligible to reapply for a period of three years.
  • A student cannot have failed out of another nursing program within the last three years.

Resources

TEAS Prep Tips (PDF - 189.60 KB)

The SMWC nursing program is accredited by the following organizations:

  • Indiana State Board of Nursing
    402 W. Washington Street, Room W072
    Indianapolis, Indiana 46204
  • North Central Association of Colleges and Schools
    Higher Learning Commission
    230 South LaSalle Street, Suite 7-500
    Chicago, IL 60604-1411
  • Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education 
    One Dupont Circle, NW Suite 530 
    Washington, DC 20036
    www.aacn.nche.edu

If you have questions, comments or complaints, you can submit them via our Student Consumer Feedback form.

Is there a required entrance test for the BSN program?

Yes, the TEAS (Test of Essential Academic Skills) is required with a score of 63%. Students who have passed the TEAS within the last two years may request an official transcript from ATI. A student is allowed to take the TEAS examination twice during an admission cycle. But if a 63% score is not attained for two consecutive admission cycles a student in eligible to apply for the SMWC Nursing program for a period of three years.

How are students selected for the program?

The pre-nursing first year is open to any student. Acceptance into the major occurs June 1 of each year. The program is authorized to admit 24 students per year. Students are selected based on meeting the admission requirements such as overall college GPA, science GPA and TEAS score. A clean criminal background check and drug screen are also required.

Is there a waiting list for the BSN program at SMWC?

No. At this time, there is not a waiting list for the nursing major.

What are the prerequisite courses I must take before beginning nursing courses?

Students are required to complete Anatomy and Physiology I and II with a grade of C or higher with two attempts maximum per course along with 30 hours of college credit to be eligible for the major. Students are also required to have earned a C or higher in all cognate courses if they have already been taken.

Where will I attend class and clinical?

Nursing students will spend most of their class time in Hulman Hall. This building houses the chemistry and biology labs as well as the nursing simulation laboratory. Clinical courses take place at our partner locations including Providence Healthcare, on campus; Union Hospital, Regional Hospital, and Hamilton Center in Terre Haute, Ind. You may also complete clinical courses at other approved sites. Approval will be determined by Marcia Ann Miller, Ph.D., R.N., Department of Nursing chair.

Is the BSN program offered online?

No. The Bachelor of Science in Nursing program is not available online. The online RN to BSN completion program is available to registered nurses holding a two-year degree.

What if I am an out-of-state student? Will I be licensed in my home state?

Yes. Candidates for RN licensure from all 50 states and U.S. territories take the same NCLEX exam. You may apply for initial licensure in any state.

What is the estimated cost of the BSN program?

The cost of a credit hour is the same for nursing as any other course at SMWC. There is an additional $200 cost for each clinical course. There are ten clinical courses in the program. This fee pays for your ATI testing package, your licensure review course, malpractice insurance, nametag and consumable products. Students must pay for their own uniforms, shoes and textbooks. All of these costs are included in the financial aid calculations.

Is financial aid available for nursing students?

Currently, nursing students are able to apply for any campus scholarships for which they meet the criteria.

For additional questions, please contact the Office of Admissions toll free at 1-800-926-7692 or admission(at)smwc.edu.