Course Requirements

The health and wellness program at Saint Mary-of-the-Woods College is only available to campus students. 

Health and Wellness Major - (48-51 credit hours)

A bachelor of science degree at Saint Mary-of-the-Woods College requires at least 125 semester hours. In addition to general studies courses and electives, the Health and Wellness major requires 48-51 semester hours.

Health and Wellness Major - Required Courses

Health and Wellness students may only take BI490 for 3-6 credits.

A study of the major unifying concepts of biology at the molecular, cellular and organismic level, including a survey of the major groups of living organisms. Three classes plus one two-hour lab per week. Course fee applies.

A study of the major unifying concepts of biology at the molecular, cellular and organismic level, including a survey of the major groups of living organisms. Three classes plus one two-hour lab per week. Course fee applies. Prerequisite: BI141.

Explores the ethical issues related to biology and the practice of medicine.

Standard topics of elementary statistics: organization of data, normal distributions, estimation, hypothesis testing, correlation and regression, chi-square and analysis of variance. Additional emphasis on selection of methods and applications to biology, particularly genetics and for undergraduate research. Use of appropriate software. Three hours concurrent with MA 253.As needed. Prerequisite: BI141 and BI 142 or consent of the instructor.

Courses addresses all the physical, chemical, and biological factors external to a person of the natural and built environmental that impacts the quality of life.

Intended for those needing a background in scientific vocabulary. Skills in understanding medical and biological terminology will be developed, making it easier to appreciate and remember meaning and spelling.

Study of the basic principles and phenomena of living organisms, interpretation of the various physio-chemical processes in animal and human metabolism; training in the physiological techniques. Designed principally for science majors. Three lectures and one two-hour laboratory. Course fee applies. Prerequisites: BI 141, BI 142, CH 115 and CH 116.

A study of the anatomical structure of the human body. Body structure will be studied by organ systems and will involve a balance between gross anatomical study and histology. Form-function relationships will be emphasized. The laboratory study will involve working with human skeletal collections and preserved specimens.

Work experience with firm or agency directly related to the student‘s major area of study. The learning experience is structured within the College approved guidelines for the internship program. Through close supervision by the director of interns, faculty advisor and the worksite supervisor, the student works toward achieving goals outlined in the individual learning contract. Normally reserved for third and fourth year students. May be repeated with different topics.

Course will explore the components of wellness and investigate opportunities within the wellness area including employer sponsored programs, community wellness programs, as well as individual wellness assessment and programs.

The background and history of public health will be explored. Analytical methods such as epidemiology and statistics will be employed to analyze some questions in the field. The biomedical basis of diseases with emphases on infectious, chronic, genetic, behavioral, and psychosocial aspects of health will be investigated.

An introduction to basic principles and concepts of epidemiology relating to the design, analysis and interpretation of epidemiological studies. Students will be expected to understand and to be able to apply measures of disease prevalence and incidence (e.g. odds, rate, or risk). The advantages and disadvantages of different study designs, including cohort, case-control and intervention studies will be examined. Problems in interpreting epidemiological data, such as chance, bias, and confounding will be considered. Students should be able to critically interpret evidence and assess causality. Prerequisite: BI 253.

The role of nutrition through the human life span will be examined . The nature of the macro--and micro-nutrition will be explored along with their function in the body. Health issues related to excess or lack of nutrients will be explored. 3 hours of lecture/discussion with laboratory related to foods.

Presentation of current peer-reviewed journal articles covering topics directly related to Health Issues. Develops critical thinking skill in evaluating published materials. Allows for increased opportunity for public speaking and communication of complex/technical information.

Social, political, esthetic, scientific and religious perspectives will be used to investigate topics related to issues of health in a variety of countries. Mathematics skills will be reinforced utilizing statistical information and manipulations of data related to health issues. Emerging diseases will be discussed and students will be asked to create a model of a current emerging disease and its probable occurrence in the next ten years. Prerequisite: Successful completion of at least one ID 3xx course.

Health and Wellness Minor (** credit hours)

The biology minor requires the completion of ** hours.

Health and Wellness Minor - Required Courses

Courses addresses all the physical, chemical, and biological factors external to a person of the natural and built environmental that impacts the quality of life.

Intended for those needing a background in scientific vocabulary. Skills in understanding medical and biological terminology will be developed, making it easier to appreciate and remember meaning and spelling.

Course will explore the components of wellness and investigate opportunities within the wellness area including employer sponsored programs, community wellness programs, as well as individual wellness assessment and programs.

The background and history of public health will be explored. Analytical methods such as epidemiology and statistics will be employed to analyze some questions in the field. The biomedical basis of diseases with emphases on infectious, chronic, genetic, behavioral, and psychosocial aspects of health will be investigated.

The role of nutrition through the human life span will be examined . The nature of the macro--and micro-nutrition will be explored along with their function in the body. Health issues related to excess or lack of nutrients will be explored. 3 hours of lecture/discussion with laboratory related to foods.

Presentation of current peer-reviewed journal articles covering topics directly related to Health Issues. Develops critical thinking skill in evaluating published materials. Allows for increased opportunity for public speaking and communication of complex/technical information.

Social, political, esthetic, scientific and religious perspectives will be used to investigate topics related to issues of health in a variety of countries. Mathematics skills will be reinforced utilizing statistical information and manipulations of data related to health issues. Emerging diseases will be discussed and students will be asked to create a model of a current emerging disease and its probable occurrence in the next ten years. Prerequisite: Successful completion of at least one ID 3xx course.

Information about Course Requirements
We do our best to keep this information updated, but you should always double-check to ensure you are meeting graduation requirements. For the most current course requirements please review the latest undergraduate college catalog.  Always consult your academic advisor when registering for courses or when you have questions about course requirements.