Art

The Art major at Saint Mary-of-the-Woods College teaches students to analyze various forms of visual expression and develop skills in a variety of two- and three-dimensional media. The major develops students as problem-solvers with abilities to communicate visually.

Why Major in Art?

As a liberal arts college since its beginning in 1840, Saint Mary-of-the-Woods College prides itself on providing an atmosphere where the arts can flourish. Through individual attention, students are encouraged to broaden their knowledge and talent. This is accomplished through a strong curriculum coupled with participation in the arts. SMWC's liberal arts base not only encourages exploration, but also provides the means by which to begin.

As traditional art disciplines are integrating digital technologies, SMWC offers a curriculum that not only teaches students the skills necessary in a variety of mediums, but also how to problem-solve and realize the best medium to communicate their concept.

Students will leave SMWC with a portfolio of professional-quality work from their art classes. Each art major will graduate with marketable digital skills, yet still have the background of a fine artist prepared for a variety of art careers.

Facilities

Hulman Hall houses the Department of Text and Image with shared space for the art, graphic design, and media art majors, including studios for drawing, painting, ceramics, and design, as well as an up-to-date computer lab. A gallery allows students the opportunity to present and exhibit their work, while a lighting studio is available for both photography and videography projects.

Students have access to a large ceramics studio with a state-of-the-art computerized kiln capable of firing large ceramic sculptures and a  variety of hand tools, Macintosh computers, scanners and printers, digital cameras, and multi-media equipment.

Faculty offices are also housed near the studios.

A baccalaureate degree at Saint Mary-of-the-Woods College requires at least 120 credit hours. In addition to the general studies courses and electives to graduate as a Saint Mary-of-the-Woods College art major, you need to complete at least 51 credit hours in art and related courses:

The Art major and minor are offered through the campus program only.

Required Courses

51 credit hours required; all courses listed.

Introduction to the basic elements and principles of design and a wide range of problem-solving strategies in a variety of mediums. Focuses on two-dimensional space organization, principles of visual perception, color and the application of the visual variables. Fall, every year. Course fee.

Introduction to the principles, techniques, and materials of three-dimensional design. Focuses on the structural components of design in a variety of mediums, as well as with the conceptual and problem-solving exploration required in the creation of sculptural forms. Winter, every year.

Students learn basic drawing skills of perception and technical drawing skills of composition, foreshortening, sighting, use of grids, and drawing in perspective. this class also covers techniques such blending, shading, and crosshatching. Winter, every year.

Introduces students to industry-standard digital imaging software in order to develop the techniques and skills necessary to create, edit and composite images. Applications of these skills are made in subjective and applied projects. Fall, every year. Course fee.

Students learn about mixed media and color, as well as continue to develop their perceptual abilities. this course focuses on the development of basic painting skills while encouraging individual expression. Fall, every year. Prerequisites: AD110, AD121.

Surveys the history of art in the western world beginning with prehistoric and extending to

Surveys the history of art in the western world beginning with prehistoric and extending to twenty-first century art. This course concentrates on the artists, the philosophies and events that have molded contemporary art. Fall, even years.

Surveys the history of women's involvement in the visual arts and the ideologies that have shaped the production of art and representation for women. Identifies the major issues and specific historical conditions that have influenced the role of women in art history and the ideologies that affected their art production. Winter, odd years. Prerequisite: AD250.

Introduces students to industry-standard illustration software and layout and design software in order to develop the techniques and skills necessary for print production. Applications of these skills are made in subjective and applied projects. Winter, every year. Course fee.

Studies a conceptual approach to the design process in which the problem is viewed as a set of relationships that exist between the complex environment of the design artifact, the human user and the encompassing environments. The emphasis is placed on the human being as a processor of visual information in a complex visual environment. Additional emphasis is placed on mental maps, visual shape and color coding, environmental way finding systems, corporate identity sign systems, and advertising. Fall, every year.

Studies the areas of human visual cognition relevant to the understanding of the parameters and constraints of the human visual information processing system, and necessary for the communication of effective visual designs. Study includes shape and symbol recognition, color memory, visual short term memory, visual long term memory, schema and past experience, culture and visual perception, and age as it relates to visual memory. Winter, even years. Prerequisite: AD260

Introduces student to the principles and basic skills of shooting photographs using digital SLR cameras. Digital editing basics will also be introduced. Application of these skills are made in subjective and applied assignments. Fall, every year. Course fee.

Students continue to learn and refine drawing and painting skills learned in foundation courses. Emphasis will be placed on the students' exploration of their unique interests. Conceptual origins of the artistic process will be examined. This course examines drawing and painting as a conceptual tool. Spring, even years. Course fee. Prerequisite: AD221

An introduction to construction techniques, firing systems and the historical origins of functional ceramics. Course will be lecture, demonstration, and applications, including technical development. Introduces when thrown forms, glazing, oxidation firing, and sculptural concerns. Fall, odd years. Course fee.

Provides students with the background, techniques, and a general experience with sequential art to convey information. Graphic storytelling, comics and animation will all be explored. Fall, even years. Prerequisites: JM 157, JM257.

Examines a variety of approaches to 3D and 4D art forms including modeling, construction, and installation. Studies the relevance of time and space as it applies to communication of the art form. Fall, every year. Course fee. Prerequisite:AD353.

In this capstone class for the Studio Art Emphasis, seniors develop self-directed proposals, processes and artifacts under the guidance of the instructor. This concluding experience will result in a presentation, exhibition, and/or performance. Winter, every year. Course fee. Prerequisite: AD452.

Required Courses

21 credit hours required; all courses listed.

Introduction to the basic elements and principles of design and a wide range of problem-solving strategies in a variety of mediums. Focuses on two-dimensional space organization, principles of visual perception, color and the application of the visual variables. Fall, every year. Course fee.

Introduction to the principles, techniques, and materials of three-dimensional design. Focuses on the structural components of design in a variety of mediums, as well as with the conceptual and problem-solving exploration required in the creation of sculptural forms. Winter, every year.

Students learn basic drawing skills of perception and technical drawing skills of composition, foreshortening, sighting, use of grids, and drawing in perspective. this class also covers techniques such blending, shading, and crosshatching. Winter, every year.

Students learn about mixed media and color, as well as continue to develop their perceptual abilities. this course focuses on the development of basic painting skills while encouraging individual expression. Fall, every year. Prerequisites: AD110, AD121.

Surveys the history of women's involvement in the visual arts and the ideologies that have shaped the production of art and representation for women. Identifies the major issues and specific historical conditions that have influenced the role of women in art history and the ideologies that affected their art production. Winter, odd years. Prerequisite: AD250.

Studies a conceptual approach to the design process in which the problem is viewed as a set of relationships that exist between the complex environment of the design artifact, the human user and the encompassing environments. The emphasis is placed on the human being as a processor of visual information in a complex visual environment. Additional emphasis is placed on mental maps, visual shape and color coding, environmental way finding systems, corporate identity sign systems, and advertising. Fall, every year.

An introduction to construction techniques, firing systems and the historical origins of functional ceramics. Course will be lecture, demonstration, and applications, including technical development. Introduces when thrown forms, glazing, oxidation firing, and sculptural concerns. Fall, odd years. Course fee.

Choose One

Choose one of the following Art Courses

Introduces students to industry-standard digital imaging software in order to develop the techniques and skills necessary to create, edit and composite images. Applications of these skills are made in subjective and applied projects. Fall, every year. Course fee.

Introduces student to the principles and basic skills of shooting photographs using digital SLR cameras. Digital editing basics will also be introduced. Application of these skills are made in subjective and applied assignments. Fall, every year. Course fee.

Art therapy utilizes art in therapy and art as therapy to help individuals express thoughts and feelings. The art major with art therapy concentration provides an educational foundation in art and psychology. Art therapists serve a variety of people in numerous settings including mental health centers, medical and cancer treatment programs, schools, nursing homes and art centers.

The American Art Therapy Association (AATA) requires a master’s degree as the entry-level degree for practicing art therapists in the United States. Saint Mary-of-the-Woods College offers a Masters of Arts in Art Therapy. Undergraduates can prepare for graduate instruction by adding a concentration of psychology courses to the Art major.

Required Courses

Art Major + 18 additional credit hours required

Provides introductory exposure to the theories, practices and literature of the profession (concern for the distinction of the appropriate therapeutic application, different populations, assessment and diagnosis, ethical issues and standards and history). Winter, odd years. Prerequisites: AR110, AR111 and PS111.

An overview of contemporary psychology introducing students to: human development, cognition and language, learning, memory, sensation, perception, motivation, emotion, biological basis of behavior, social psychology, personality, psychopathology and psychotherapy. The focus of the course is on both the scientific method of acquiring psychological data, as well as the theories which interpret that data and help guide further research in the field. For majors and non-majors, this course also serves as the prerequisite for most psychology classes. Fulfills general studies requirement.

Studies human physical, cognitive, personality, emotional, social and moral development and change from conception to death. Prerequisite: PS111.

Considers the processes of learning and memory based on contemporary research and theory. Focuses on how learning processes work in animals and humans, as well as the practical aspects of the psychology of learning. Prerequisite: PS 111.

Studies the dynamics of abnormal behavior including etiology, diagnosis, treatment and prevention of emotional disorders, psychoses, substance abuse and childhood disorders. Prerequisite: PS 111.

Extensive coverage of the basic concepts and methods, major theories and results of research in the field of personality. Prerequisite: PS 111.

Careers in Art

Classes at SWMC will prepare you for a variety of art careers including:

Arts Administrator

In the business end of an art and design organization, an arts administrator is responsible for the everyday operation of the organization. This may include professional for-profit, and many professional and nonprofessional not-for-profit, arts-related businesses. Duties often consist of managing a staff, marketing, maintaining budgets, developing programs, and raising funds.

Art Director

In charge of the overall visual appearance of an art and design project, and how it communicates and appeals to the target audience. They are often responsible for unifying the direction of an art piece that multiple artists may develop, and decide what visual elements and artistic style should be used.

Art Studio Manager

Often responsible for running a creative studio technically, logistically, and in regards to resource management. They also often have a hands-on creative role, sometimes taking on the additional role of Art Director.

Art Teacher

With additional classes from the Education Department, art education majors will have the opportunity to learn through the creation of personal art through exposure to a variety of media and styles. Becoming an art teacher offers the chance to provide children the means to express themselves, develop learning skills, and stimulate self-esteem.

Art Therapist

Uses art and the creative process to help their clients deal with mental health issues. Art Therapy combines knowledge of visual art with psychology and human development. This profession requires a master’s degree in art therapy, but you can complete SMWC’s undergraduate art therapy concentration to prepare you for graduate school.

Curator

Often responsible for a gallery or museum's collections, a curator may decide what to acquire, and oversee the care and documentation of the collection. They may also conduct research based on the collection, work with other galleries and museums to loan pieces from it, and share it with the public through exhibitions and publications.

Display Designer

Plans and installs displays in the windows of high fashion stores, family-owned shops, and every place in-between. They work full-time with large retail stores, and on contract with smaller shops, to conceptualize and produce designs in order to promote the store's merchandise.

Exhibition Designer and Technician

Typically responsible for planning, designing, and putting together exhibits in museums, galleries, and other cultural institutions.

Freelance Artist

Contracted by private individuals or companies to create artwork.

Illustrator

Often charged with enhancing writing by creating visual representations of the textual content. Illustrations are often used in advertisements, posters, books and magazines, greeting cards, and a variety of other media.

Scenic Painter

Typically paints scenery and backdrops, though they may also be responsible for painting props. They  must have an understanding of a variety of painting techniques, including landscapes and portraits, along with experience in sculpture.

Surface Designer

Designs the patterns for both two-dimensional and three-dimensional objects, including fabric & textiles, paper goods, gift wrap, and many other products.