Be Future-Ready with Woods Core

Your four years at Saint Mary-of-the-Woods College (SMWC) will be as unique as you are. You will establish a solid foundation and then be ready to go beyond.

You will be encouraged to develop new perspectives so that you can think differently about issues that can change lives. You will learn how to analyze complex problems from multiple angles, so that you are not caught off guard in a crisis. You will also have opportunities to investigate critical issues in society and the environment.

A typical general education curriculum requires 50-60 credit hours. At SMWC, you will only need 39 credit hours to complete the Woods Core, giving you more time for second majors, minors or internships. You can even focus more time on plunging yourself in adventures studying abroad.

These perspectives make graduates in any field, from computers to communication, art to accounting, more marketable in their careers. In other words, you will be ready for a career that fulfills your life.

Woods Core Courses

Woods Core courses are offered on a rotating basis. To assist with course planning, you may refer to the Woods Core grid, the Woods Core Course Rotation schedule, or contact your academic advisors. The following is the recommended order of participation in the Woods Core to ensure that you have only one critical thinking and writing course per semester and that these courses are taken throughout the time you are developing academically. If you are transferring courses or other college credit, Woods Core courses may be taken in other combinations with the provision that no more than two of the critical thinking/writing courses may be taken simultaneously.

Required Courses

Each of the following courses are required under the Woods Core Curriculum

Provides students with a theoretical foundation and application practice in a variety of communication contexts. Students examine the principles of effective communications and behaviors in intrapersonal, interpersonal, mass, and public communication. class activities and oral assignments engage students in the practical application of these principles. Fulfills general studies requirement. Campus only.

WC 100 uses the concept of utopias, and how they have influenced societies, education and the world, to introduce students to the concept of the SMWC community and its particular values and ideas. Includes emphases on critical thinking and writing, as well as information literacy. Serves as a foundation to help students identify their individual goals and values.

Required Course

The following course is required under the Woods Core Curriculum

Offers students strategies for critical reading and writing, guided practice through the steps of the writing process, and instruction in library and on-line research. Emphasis on effective academic writing and the scholarly use of sources in documented research papers. Fulfills general studies requirement.

Electives

Choose one of the below courses to fulfill Woods Core Requirements

Studies the use of functions, especially linear and exponential functions, to model realistic problems. Functions are presented using formulas, tables, graphs and words. The writing of clear and correct solutions is emphasized. A graphing calculator is required.Based on the result of a placement test or SAT/ACT scores, the student also may be required to take Fundamentals of Mathematics (MA 101) as a prerequisite for MA 112.

Organization of data; binomial, normal and t distributions; estimation; hypothesis testing; correlation and regression; chi-square; analysis of variance; application to business decisions and experiments in natural and social sciences. Use of appropriate computer software. Fulfills general studies requirement. Prerequisite: MA112 or placement.

Required Course

The following course is required under the Woods Core Curriculum

Survey of major events and developments of twentieth-century history, worldwide. Topics will include the two World Wars; the Holocaust; independence movements in Europe‘s colonies; revolutions; communism, fascism, socialism, laissez-faire capitalism, economic globalization; women‘s liberation; cultural trends including cultural diversity; and the role of technology in shaping today‘s world.

Electives

Choose one of the below courses to fulfill Woods Core Requirements

Surveys the fundamental principles of macroeconomics. Provides a working understand of the economy as a whole, noting interrelationships among concerns of contemporary society, world affairs and government fiscal and monetary policies. Fulfills general studies requirement.

An overview of contemporary psychology introducing students to: human development, cognition and language, learning, memory, sensation, perception, motivation, emotion, biological basis of behavior, social psychology, personality, psychopathology and psychotherapy. The focus of the course is on both the scientific method of acquiring psychological data, as well as the theories which interpret that data and help guide further research in the field. For majors and non-majors, this course also serves as the prerequisite for most psychology classes. Fulfills general studies requirement.

Studies the basic principles, perspectives and concepts of sociology. Broad overview with emphasis on social structure, social interaction, culture, socialization, groups, formal organization, stratification, social institutions and social change. Fulfills general studies requirement.

Required Course

The following course is required under the Woods Core Curriculum

TH 200 is a study of religion and spirituality and their relationship to social justice, women’s issues and environmental sustainability. The course introduces students to the nature of religion and spirituality and examines how they can generate and support a vision of life focused on service and a commitment to social justice. The vision and ministries of the Sisters of Providence will be taken as examples and illustrations of a service-oriented lifestyle that is grounded in spirituality and religion.

Electives

Choose one of the below courses to fulfill Woods Core Requirements

Studies the development of formal and contextual criteria leading to an understanding of the visual language of art and its application to personal, societal, cultural and aesthetic concerns. Provides a knowledge base of information and visual literacy skills necessary for informed critical analysis, discussion, interpretation and appreciation of the visual arts. Fulfills general studies requirement. Fall and Winter, every year.

This course introduces students to a rich and diverse history of American popular music. Students will listen critically to both recorded and live music, discussing and writing about the music itself and about its cultural and historical content and significance.

Required Course

The following course is required under the Woods Core Curriculum

Examines the philosophical roots of ideas and beliefs both of the western and non-western world by clarifying, questioning, and evaluating the most basic assumptions about life and meaning. Challenges students to think intentionally, seriously, rigorously, and thoroughly. Fulfills general studies requirement.

Electives

Choose any level appropriate French of Spanish Class or the below course to fulfill Woods Core Requirements

A comparative culture class in which students learn to communicate effectively with people of different cultural backgrounds. By examining the tenets of cultural and intercultural communication theories, students will have a better understanding of different cultures from their own.

Required Course

The following course is required under the Woods Core Curriculum

Introduces to the creative and critical processes in literature. Using examples of poetry, fiction, and drama this course emphasizes methods of writing and reading critically about literature. Fulfills Woods Core requirement.

Electives

Choose one of the below courses to fulfill Woods Core Requirements

A study of the normal integrated functioning of the human organism in the context of principles and concepts relating the human organism to its environment. The major unifying concept of biology – evolution – is used as a framework for this study. Emphasis is placed on the scientific method and other problem-solving techniques. Fulfills general studies requirement. Course fee applies. Prerequisite: Score of 38 or better on mathematics placement exam or completion of MA 101.

Offers a basic knowledge of the science of chemistry as a tool for understanding the physical world. With this knowledge, we examine the following: how scientists approach and solve problems and how chemistry-related concepts appear in our day-to-day lives. No prior chemistry background is assumed. Fulfills general studies requirement. Prerequisites: Score of 38 or better on mathematics placement test or completion of MA 101. Course fee applies.

Required Course

Choose one of the below courses to fulfill Woods Core Requirements

The WC 401 Social Justice course is an optional course within the Woods Core that meets general education requirements. The course examines social justice issues that have impacted present and recent social conditions worldwide. While the course will provide grounding for social justice topics in associated areas in the social sciences, including sociology, business and economics, it will primarily focus on social justice movements in the light of spirituality, specifically how individual spirituality has impacted social justice movements. Spiritual roots of social movements in major faith traditions will be explored. In this context the course will also introduce students to some of the methods used by leaders of impactful social justice movements. Finally, the effects of advances in information and media technology on social movements will also be studied.

This course will introduce participants to the goals, principles and practical applications of sustainability. Many organizations, companies and institutions are increasingly interested in conducting their activities while becoming more sensitive to environmental, social and other concerns over a longer-term future. Sustainability has many definitions, and includes environmental, social and economic dimensions. In this course, we will examine the major environmental issues and trends happening in modern society from a scientific and practical perspective, including energy and resource use, pollution, climate change, water and population. Five major themes in sustainability will be discussed: sustainability and the link to the Sisters of Providence, conservation, food sustainability, social justice, and financial sustainability.

An integrative view of women worldwide who have taken on leadership roles in their communities and initiated cultural changes. Students will examine transformative models of leadership that have addressed critical issues around the world. An introduction to international cultural norms and their influences on the struggles that women often face within their own countries and communities. A Vision for Change project is a required component of this course.

You will work closely with your advisors to ensure that you are taking the appropriate courses, as some courses may be required in your major(s) and minor(s).