SMWC Conference For Girls To Explore Science, Technology, Engineering And Math

September 10th, 2010 | SMWC

expanding your horizons

Girls in sixth through eighth grades are invited to explore science, technology, engineering and math during the Expanding Your Horizons career conference at Saint Mary-of-the-Woods College (SMWC) on Sept. 18. Registration is available online at http://eyh.smwc.edu

Expanding Your Horizons (EYH) is a career conference for girls in sixth through eighth grades, and it is designed to highlight the wonderful and interesting career possibilities that are available in science, technology, engineering and math. Numerous EYH conferences are held throughout the United States each year, and this is the only conference in the Wabash Valley area. The conference, which will run from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m., will feature Jennifer Hicks, Ph.D., science curriculum specialist with the Indiana Department of Education as the keynote speaker. Hicks will share her experiences as a research scientist working on fruit flies and reflect on which things she found most challenging on her journey to become a scientist.

The conference will also include hands-on workshops led by professional women who are working in the fields of science, technology, engineering and math. Girls who attend will get the chance to participate in two of the following workshops:

WHEN “MEOW” OR “WOOF” MEANS “OUCH, THAT HURTS!”
How do doctors treat patients who can’t tell them in words what is wrong? In this workshop find out what a typical day is like for a vet, and have a chance to evaluate some furry patients! Nancy Schenck, D.V.M., Veterinarian, Petcare Animal Hospital

THE HORSE IS YOUR MIRROR!
Students will compare their skeletal system with that of the horse. The horse’s skeleton is surprisingly similar. Students will increase their understanding of the horse’s body and how it relates to their own. Come to the stable to see a real horse! Sara Schulz, Assistant Professor in Equine Studies, Saint Mary-of-the-Woods College

I AM A MATERIALS GIRL!
Discover the amazing behavior of polymers, a common type of engineering material, through experimenting with a fun, polymer-based craft material, called Shrinky Dinks. How do Shrinky Dinks get their incredible ability to shrink to a fraction of their original size when heated? Kathleen Toohey, Ph.D., Professor of Mechanical Engineering, Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology

DOES MAGNETIC ATTRACTION ATTRACT YOU?
Discover some basic facts of magnetism and how they can be used to illustrate some complicated phenomena. Supida Kirtley, Ph.D. Research Physicist, Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology

WHO SHOULD UNDERSTAND STATISTICS? YOU!
Statistics are used in virtually every field of study to show the effectiveness of drugs, predict the outcome of elections, understand the factors that contribute to peoples’ actions and attitudes, and many other applications. Come find out how statistics REALLY work!
Concetta DePaolo and Connie McLaren, Statistics Professors, Indiana State University

GO GO GADGET ROBOTS!
Do you ever wish you could build a robot to clean your room? Do the dishes? Do
your homework? Explore what it takes to make a robot and program it to do what you want it to do! Holly Elizabeth Herbert, Program Development Manager,
Girl Scouts of Central Indiana

TECHNOLOGY AND FASHION!
We will create a small do it yourself craft project using LEDs, batteries, and conductive thread to make a simple circuit that can be transformed into a zipper pull for your book bag, a keychain, a bracelet, or necklace. Technology is fun, fashion is fun, put them together and it’s double the fun! Lana Lytle, Associate Professor, Computer Information Systems, Saint Mary-of-the-Woods College

THE BEAT OF YOUR HEART!
In this workshop you will become a blood cell and follow the path the blood takes through the heart picking up oxygen from the lungs and taking it to the tissues of the body. You will also listen to your own heartbeats at various points along the way.
Jacqueline Holder, D.O., Pediatrician, UAP Clinic

CELL CULTURE AS A BLACK ART!
What is a cell culture and why is it vitally important in the pharmaceutical industry? You will see examples of how to use math to do plating, subculturing, etc. and work through some problems of your own. Erin Brackney-Heflin ‘07, Advanced Testing Laboratory,
Eli Lilly Corporate Center

SO YOU WANT TO BE A MILLIONAIRE!
This workshop will explore the time-value of money and the rule of 72. You will take a fun quiz called “The Truth about Millionaires” and explore how you can get started now!
Patty Butwin, Adjunct Professor of Mathematics, Saint Mary-of-the-Woods College

CSI - SAINT MARY-OF-THE-WOODS!
Not for the faint of heart (or queasy of the stomach)! You will create blood spatter patterns at your own crime scene and learn to analyze the data from other groups. Work
just like they do in a real crime lab! Lab coats, goggles and gloves (and “blood”) provided. Diedre Adams, Science Teacher, West Vigo Middle School

THE DIRT ON WORMS!
Go below the surface to discover the hidden world of worms and the colony of
decomposers doing nature’s work. Theresa Boland, SP, Assistant Professor and
Master Gardener, Saint Mary-of-the-Woods College

PROGRAM FOR PARENTS
A separate program for parents and adults will run concurrently with the girls workshops. Learn how to encourage your girls to remain interested in math and science. Learn how to motivate them to pursue their careers of interest. These sessions will help parents understand why they need to be supportive of young girls’ choices and how to help them achieve their goals.

Cost to register for the conference is $20, and the registration fee includes lunch and a t-shirt. If a student and a parent wish to register, the cost is $20 per person and two separate registrations must be submitted. For more information about the Expanding Your Horizons conference, contact Anneliese Payne, Ph.D., 812-535-5183 or apayne@smwc.edu.

More information about the Expanding Your Horizons network can be found at www.expandingyourhorizons.org.

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